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System Volume Information Folder

  • Začetnik teme Angelus
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Angelus

Angelus

Administrator
#1
If you've done much wandering around in Windows Explorer you might have noticed a folder called System Volume Information and wondered what purpose it serves. It's actually a part of System Restore; the tool that allows you to set points in time to roll back your computer. The System Volume Information folder is where XP stores these points and associated information that makes them accessible. If you have System Restore enabled but don't see this folder, go into [Tools] [Folder Options] [View] and click the radio button next to [Show Hidden Files and Folders] and it will be visible.

How many System Volume Information folders your computer has and where they are located depends on the settings you've selected for System Restore.

Accessing the System Volume Information Folder
Under most circumstances there is no need to access this folder, but if you're the curious type and want to see what it contains, how you gain access depends on the XP version, file system, and whether you are part of a domain.

Windows XP Professional and Home Edition - FAT32 File System

In Windows Explorer click [Tools] [Folder Options]
Click the [View] tab, click [Show Hidden Files and Folders]
Clear [Hide protected operating system files (Recommended)] check box.
Click [Yes] on the change confirmation box and click [OK] to exit.
Double-click the System Volume Information folder to open.

Windows XP Professional using the NTFS File System on a Workgroup or Standalone Computer

In Windows Explorer click [Tools] [Folder Options]
Click the [View] tab, click [Show Hidden Files and Folders]
Clear [Hide protected operating system files (Recommended)] check box.
Click [Yes] on the change confirmation box and click [OK] to exit.
Right-click the System Volume Information folder in the root folder.
Click [Properties] and select the [Security] tab. Click [Add]
Enter the name of the user you are allowing access to the folder.
Click [OK], and then click [OK].
Double-click the System Volume Information folder to open.

Windows XP Professional Using the NTFS File System on a Domain

In Windows Explorer click [Tools] [Folder Options]
Click the [View] tab, click [Show Hidden Files and Folders]
Clear [Hide protected operating system files (Recommended)] check box.
Click [Yes] on the change confirmation box and click [OK] to exit.
Right-click the System Volume Information folder in the root folder.
Click [Properties] and select the [Security] tab. Click [Add]
Enter the name of the user you are allowing access to the folder and select the account location.
Click [OK], and then click [OK].
Double-click the System Volume Information folder to open.

Using CACLS with Windows XP Home Edition Using the NTFS File System

In Windows XP Home Edition with the NTFS file system, it's necessary to take a different approach since Simple File Sharing does not allow modifying the Access Control Lists (ACL's). The result is the same, but you use the Cacls command-line tool to modify file or folder access control lists (ACL's).

Click [Start] [Run] type cmd and click [OK].
Navigate to the root folder of the partition where the System Volume Information folder you want to access is located.
Type cacls ":\System Volume Information" /E /G <username>:F and press ENTER
Note: In this instance, make sure you type the quotation marks as shown in the line above.Double-click the System Volume Information folder to open.

To remove permissions, type cacls ":\System Volume Information" /E /R <username> at the command prompt to remove all permissions for the user.

Using Safe Mode To Bypass Simple File Sharing
In situations where Simple File Sharing is being used it's easier to start the computer in Safe Mode because Simple File Sharing is off by default when XP is booted into Safe Mode. This is exactly the same routine that is detailed above in the "Windows XP Professional using the NTFS File System on a Workgroup or Standalone Computer" section.

In Windows Explorer click [Tools] [Folder Options]
Click the [View] tab, click [Show Hidden Files and Folders]
Clear [Hide protected operating system files (Recommended)] check box.
Click [Yes] on the change confirmation box and click [OK] to exit.
Right-click the System Volume Information folder in the root folder.
Click [Properties] and select the [Security] tab. Click [Add]
Enter the name of the user you are allowing access to the folder.
Click [OK], and then click [OK].
Double-click the System Volume Information folder to open.

In all likelihood you'll never have any reason to access the System Volume Information folder other than to satisfy your own curiosity as to what it contains, but you never know; having that little piece of info tucked away may prove invaluable one day.
 
Angelus

Angelus

Administrator
#2
System Restore
One area I’ve always felt was lacking in past Windows versions was the ability to undo changes that were made to the operating system. If you make a lot of changes, as I do, eventually your system will head south with little hope of recovery other than a full reformat and reinstall. I’m told that Windows Me had the capability to roll itself back to previous configurations. Since my total working time with Windows Me was about ten minutes (long enough to initiate a reformat) I’ll proceed under the guise that system restore is a fine innovation for XP.

System%20Restore%201.gif


This is the opening screen for System Restore, accessible by clicking [Start] [All Programs] [Accessories] [System Tools] [System Restore]. Choose from the bulleted options on the right whether you want to restore your computer to an earlier time or create a new restore point for future use.

System%20Restore%202.gif


If you have chosen to restore to a previously established restore point the screen above will open. The calendar on the left will have dates in bold. Selecting a day will show the restore points available for that date in the breakout to the right of the calendar. Select the restore point you want and click [Next].

System%20Restore%203.gif


Last chance (not really) before you start the restore process. I say not really because one of the excellent features of System Restore is the ability to undo any restore performed. The [Help and Support] option available from the [Start] menu is an excellent source of more information on the different types of restore points available. Search under “System Restore”.

System%20Restore%205.gif


When you choose to establish a new restore point rather than go back to a previous restore point the screen above will open. Simply type in a name for the restore point in the data entry box. Be descriptive in your naming to make it easier when you come back to do a restore. Click [Create] and the process will begin.

System%20Restore%204.gif


The opening screen for System Restore contains a link called [System Restore Settings]. Clicking it will open the System Properties page which is accessible from many different locations and via many methods. The property page allows you to disable System Restore on any or all drives with the one caveat that it must be enabled on C:\ if any of the other drives are enabled. Click [Settings] to open the page shown below.

System%20Restore%206.gif


The Settings Property Sheet allows you to select the percentage of the drive space allocated to restore points. The default setting is 12% of total drive size, but this can be increased or decreased depending on the number of restore points you want to have available.
 

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