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Top 100 Members Choice Albums of all Time Collection

Diskusija u 'Torrent Muzika' započeta od boki71, 29.01.2013.

  1. boki71

    boki71 Uz duplu Anu... Administrator

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    75 Bob Dylan - The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan (1963)

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    It's hard to overestimate the importance of The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan, the record that firmly established Dylan as an unparalleled songwriter, one of considerable skill, imagination, and vision. At the time, folk had been quite popular on college campuses and bohemian circles, making headway onto the pop charts in diluted form, and while there certainly were a number of gifted songwriters, nobody had transcended the scene as Dylan did with this record. There are a couple (very good) covers, with "Corrina Corrina" and "Honey Just Allow Me One More Chance," but they pale with the originals here. At the time, the social protests received the most attention, and deservedly so, since "Blowin' in the Wind," "Masters of War," and "A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall" weren't just specific in their targets; they were gracefully executed and even melodic. Although they've proven resilient throughout the years, if that's all Freewheelin' had to offer, it wouldn't have had its seismic impact, but this also revealed a songwriter who could turn out whimsy ("Don't Think Twice, It's All Right"), gorgeous love songs ("Girl From the North Country"), and cheerfully absurdist humor ("Bob Dylan's Blues," "Bob Dylan's Dream") with equal skill. This is rich, imaginative music, capturing the sound and spirit of America as much as that of Louis Armstrong, Hank Williams, or Elvis Presley. Dylan, in many ways, recorded music that equaled this, but he never topped it.

    Track List

    1
    Blowin' in the Wind
    Bob Dylan
    Bob Dylan
    2:49
    2
    Girl from the North Country
    Bob Dylan
    Bob Dylan
    3:23
    3
    Masters of War
    Bob Dylan
    Bob Dylan
    4:38
    4
    Down the Highway
    Bob Dylan
    Bob Dylan
    3:32
    5
    Bob Dylan's Blues
    Bob Dylan
    Bob Dylan
    2:28
    6
    A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall
    Bob Dylan
    Bob Dylan
    6:53
    7
    Don't Think Twice, It's All Right
    Bob Dylan
    Bob Dylan
    3:40
    8
    Bob Dylan's Dream
    Bob Dylan
    Bob Dylan
    5:02
    9
    Oxford Town
    Bob Dylan
    Bob Dylan
    1:50
    10
    Talkin' World War III Blues
    Bob Dylan
    Bob Dylan
    6:27
    11
    Corrina, Corrina
    Traditional
    Bob Dylan
    2:44
    12
    Honey, Just Allow Me One More Chance
    Bob Dylan / Henry Thomas
    Bob Dylan
    2:00
    13
    I Shall Be Free
    Bob Dylan
    Bob Dylan
    4:47

    74 The Band - Music from Big Pink (1968)

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    None of the Band's previous work gave much of a clue about how they would sound when they released their first album in July 1968. As it was, Music from Big Pink came as a surprise. At first blush, the group seemed to affect the sound of a loose jam session, alternating emphasis on different instruments, while the lead and harmony vocals passed back and forth as if the singers were making up their blend on the spot. In retrospect, especially as the lyrics sank in, the arrangements seemed far more considered and crafted to support a group of songs that took family, faith, and rural life as their subjects and proceeded to imbue their values with uncertainty. Some songs took on the theme of declining institutions less clearly than others, but the points were made musically as much as lyrically. Tenor Richard Manuel's haunting, lonely voice gave the album much of its frightening aspect, while Rick Danko's and Levon Helm's rough-hewn styles reinforced the songs' rustic fervor. The dominant instrument was Garth Hudson's often icy and majestic organ, while Robbie Robertson's unusual guitar work further destabilized the sound. The result was an album that reflected the turmoil of the late '60s in a way that emphasized the tragedy inherent in the conflicts. Music from Big Pink came off as a shockingly divergent musical statement only a year after the ornate productions of Sgt. Pepper, and initially attracted attention because of the three songs Bob Dylan had either written or co-written. However, as soon as "The Weight" became a minor singles chart entry, the album and the group made their own impact, influencing a movement toward roots styles and country elements in rock. Over time, Music from Big Pink came to be regarded as a watershed work in the history of rock, one that introduced new tones and approaches to the constantly evolving genre.

    Track List

    1
    Tears of Rage
    Bob Dylan / Richard Manuel
    The Band
    5:23
    2
    To Kingdom Come
    Robbie Robertson
    The Band
    3:22
    3
    In a Station
    Richard Manuel
    The Band
    3:34
    4
    Caledonia Mission
    Robbie Robertson
    The Band
    2:59
    5
    The Weight
    Robbie Robertson
    The Band
    4:38
    6
    We Can Talk
    Richard Manuel
    The Band
    3:06
    7
    Long Black Veil
    Danny Dill / Marijohn Wilkin
    The Band
    3:06
    8
    Chest Fever
    Robbie Robertson
    The Band
    5:18
    9
    Lonesome Suzie
    Richard Manuel
    The Band
    4:04
    10
    This Wheel's on Fire
    Rick Danko / Bob Dylan
    The Band
    3:14
    11
    I Shall Be Released
    Bob Dylan
    The Band
    3:19

    73 Oasis - (What's The Story) Morning Glory? (1995)

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    If Definitely Maybe was an unintentional concept album about wanting to be a rock & roll star, (What's the Story) Morning Glory? is what happens after the dreams come true. Oasis turns in a relatively introspective second record, filled with big, gorgeous ballads instead of ripping rockers. Unlike Definitely Maybe, the production on Morning Glory is varied enough to handle the range in emotions; instead of drowning everything with amplifiers turned up to 12, there are strings, keyboards, and harmonicas. This expanded production helps give Noel Gallagher's sweeping melodies an emotional resonance that he occasionally can't convey lyrically. However, that is far from a fatal flaw; Gallagher's lyrics work best in fragments, where the images catch in your mind and grow, thanks to the music. Gallagher may be guilty of some borrowing, or even plagiarism, but he uses the familiar riffs as building blocks. This is where his genius lies: He's a thief and doesn't have many original thoughts, but as a pop/rock melodicist he's pretty much without peer. Likewise, as musicians, Oasis are hardly innovators, yet they have a majestic grandeur in their sound that makes ballads like "Wonderwall" or rockers like "Some Might Say" positively transcendent. Alan White does add authority to the rhythm section, but the most noticeable change is in Liam Gallagher. His voice sneered throughout Definitely Maybe, but on Morning Glory his singing has become more textured and skillful. He gives the lyric in the raging title track a hint of regret, is sympathetic on "Wonderwall," defiant on "Some Might Say," and humorous on "She's Electric," a bawdy rewrite of "Digsy's Diner." It might not have the immediate impact of Definitely Maybe, but Morning Glory is just as exciting and compulsively listenable.

    Track List

    1
    Hello
    Noel Gallagher / Gary Glitter / Mike Leander
    Oasis
    3:32
    2
    Roll with It
    Noel Gallagher
    Oasis
    4:00
    3
    Wonderwall
    Noel Gallagher
    Oasis
    4:19
    4
    Don't Look Back in Anger
    Noel Gallagher
    Oasis
    4:48
    5
    Hey Now!
    Noel Gallagher
    Oasis
    5:41
    6
    [Untitled Track]
    Noel Gallagher
    Oasis
    0:45
    7
    Some Might Say
    Noel Gallagher
    Oasis
    5:29
    8
    Cast No Shadow
    Noel Gallagher
    Oasis
    4:52
    9
    She's Electric
    Noel Gallagher
    Oasis
    3:41
    10
    Morning Glory
    Noel Gallagher
    Oasis
    5:03
    11
    [Untitled Track]
    Noel Gallagher
    Oasis
    0:40
    12
    Champagne Supernova
    Noel Gallagher
    Oasis
    7:28

    72 Johnny Cash - American Recordings (1994)

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    Johnny Cash was in the unenviable position of being a living legend who was beloved by fans of classic country music without being able to interest anyone in his most recent work when he was signed to Rick Rubin's American Recordings label in 1994. Rubin, best known for his work with edgy rockers and hip-hop acts, opted to produce Cash's first album for American, and as he tried to brainstorm an approach that would introduce Cash to a new audience, he struck upon a brilliant idea -- doing nothing. For American Recordings, Rubin simply set up some recording equipment in Cash's Tennessee cabin and recorded him singing a set of songs accompanied only by his acoustic guitar. The result is an album that captured the glorious details of Johnny Cash's voice and allowed him to demonstrate just how emotionally powerful an instrument he possessed. While Rubin clearly brought some material to Cash for these sessions -- it's hard to imagine he would have recorded tunes by Glenn Danzig or Tom Waits without a bit of prodding -- Cash manages to put his stamp on every tune on this set, and he also brought some excellent new songs to the table, including the Vietnam veteran's memoir "Drive On," the powerful testimony of faith "Redemption," and a sly but moving recollection of his wild younger days, "Like a Soldier." American Recordings became a critical sensation and a commercial success, though it was overrated in some quarters simply because it reminded audiences that one of America's greatest musical talents was still capable of making compelling music, something he had never stopped doing even if no one bothered to listen. Still, American Recordings did something very important -- it gave Cash a chance to show how much he could do with a set of great songs and no creative interference, and it afforded him the respect he'd been denied for so long, and the result is a powerful and intimate album that brought the Man in Black back to the spotlight, where he belonged.

    Track List

    1
    Delia's Gone
    Karl Silbersdorf / Dick Toops
    Johnny Cash
    2:17
    2
    Let the Train Blow the Whistle
    Johnny Cash
    Johnny Cash
    2:15
    3
    The Beast in Me
    Nick Lowe
    Johnny Cash
    2:45
    4
    Drive On
    Johnny Cash
    Johnny Cash
    2:23
    5
    Why Me Lord?
    Kris Kristofferson
    Johnny Cash
    2:20
    6
    Thirteen
    Glenn Danzig
    Johnny Cash
    2:29
    7
    Oh, Bury Me Not (Introduction: A Cowboy's Prayer)
    Alan Lomax / John A. Lomax / Roy Rogers / Tim Spencer
    Johnny Cash
    3:52
    8
    Bird on a Wire
    Leonard Cohen
    Johnny Cash
    4:01
    9
    Tennessee Stud
    Jimmie Driftwood
    Johnny Cash
    2:54
    10
    Down There by the Train
    Tom Waits
    Johnny Cash
    5:34
    11
    Redemption
    Johnny Cash
    Johnny Cash
    3:03
    12
    Like a Soldier
    Johnny Cash
    Johnny Cash
    2:50
    13
    The Man Who Couldn't Cry
    Loudon Wainwright III
    Johnny Cash
    5:01

    71 Eminem - The Slim Shady LP (1999)

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    Given his subsequent superstardom, culminating in no less than an Academy Award, it may be easy to overlook exactly how demonized Eminem was once his mainstream debut album, The Slim Shady LP, grabbed the attention of pop music upon its release in 1999. Then, it wasn't clear to every listener that Eminem was, as they say, an unreliable narrator, somebody who slung satire, lies, uncomfortable truths, and lacerating insights with vigor and venom, blurring the line between reality and parody, all seemingly without effort. The Slim Shady LP bristles with this tension, since it's never always clear when Marshall Mathers is joking and when he's dead serious. This was unsettling in 1999, when nobody knew his back-story, and years later, when his personal turmoil is public knowledge, it still can be unsettling, because his words and delivery are that powerful. Of course, nowhere is this more true than on "97 Bonnie and Clyde," a notorious track where he imagines killing his wife and then disposing of the body with his baby daughter in tow. There have been more violent songs in rap, but few more disturbing, and it's not because of what it describes, it's how he describes it -- how the perfectly modulated phrasing enhances the horror and black humor of his words. Eminem's supreme gifts are an expansive vocabulary and vivid imagination, which he unleashes with wicked humor and unsparing anger in equal measure. The production -- masterminded by Dr. Dre but also helmed in large doses by Marky and Jeff Bass, along with Marshall himself -- mirrors his rhymes, with their spare, intricately layered arrangements enhancing his narratives, which are always at the forefront. As well they should be -- there are few rappers as wildly gifted verbally as Eminem. At a time when many rappers were stuck in the stultifying swamp of gangsta clichés, Eminem broke through the hardcore murk by abandoning the genre's familiar themes and flaunting a style with more verbal muscle and imagination than any of his contemporaries. Years later, as the shock has faded, it's those lyrical skills and the subtle mastery of the music that still resonate, and they're what make The Slim Shady LP one of the great debuts in both hip-hop and modern pop music.

    Track List

    1
    Public Service Announcement
    Jeff Bass / Eminem
    Jeff Bass
    0:33
    2
    My Name Is
    Dr. Dre / Eminem
    Eminem
    4:28
    3
    Guilty Conscience
    Dr. Dre / Eminem
    Eminem
    3:19
    4
    Brain Damage
    Jeff Bass / Marky Bass / Marshall Mathers
    Eminem
    3:46
    5
    Paul
    DJ Paul Bunyon
    0:15
    6
    If I Had
    Jeff Bass / Marky Bass / Marshall Mathers
    Eminem
    4:05
    7
    '97 Bonnie & Clyde
    Jeff Bass / Marky Bass / Marshall Mathers
    Eminem
    5:16
    8
    Bitch
    Winkler, Zoe
    0:19
    9
    Role Model
    Dr. Dre / Marshall Mathers / Mel-Man
    Eminem
    3:25
    10
    Lounge
    Eminem
    feat. Jeff Bass, Marky Bass 0:46
    11
    My Fault
    Jeff Bass / Marky Bass / Marshall Mathers
    Eminem
    4:01
    12
    Ken Kaniff
    Eminem
    feat. Aristotle, Marky Bass 1:16
    13
    Cum on Everybody
    Jeff Bass / Marky Bass / Marshall Mathers
    Eminem
    3:39
    14
    Rock Bottom
    Jeff Bass / Marky Bass / Marshall Mathers
    Eminem
    3:34
    15
    Just Don't Give a Fuck
    Jeff Bass / Marky Bass / Marshall Mathers
    Eminem
    4:02
    16
    Soap
    Eminem
    feat. Royce da 5'9", Jeff Bass 0:34
    17
    As the World Turns
    Jeff Bass / Marky Bass / Marshall Mathers
    Eminem
    4:25
    18
    I'm Shady
    Jeff Bass / Marky Bass / Marshall Mathers
    Eminem
    3:31
    19
    Bad Meets Evil
    Jeff Bass / Marky Bass / Marshall Mathers
    Eminem
    feat. Royce da 5'9" 4:13
    20
    Still Don't Give a Fuck
    Jeff Bass / Marky Bass / Marshall Mathers
    Eminem
    4:12


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  2. boki71

    boki71 Uz duplu Anu... Administrator

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    80 Simon & Garfunkel - Simon and Garfunkel's Greatest Hits (1972)

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    This album has had over three decades to make an impact, and it says something for its staying power that, in the face of more recent, more generously programmed, and better mastered compilations of the duo's work, it remains one of the most popular parts of the Simon & Garfunkel catalog -- which doesn't mean it isn't fraught with frustrations for anyone buying it. Its very existence is something of a fluke -- in the spring of 1972, the five original Simon & Garfunkel albums, Wednesday Morning, 3 AM, Sounds of Silence, Parsley, Sage, Rosemary & Thyme, Bookends and Bridge Over Troubled Water, were still selling almost as well as they had in the 1960s; indeed, Bridge Over Troubled Water had carved out a seemingly permanent place for itself on the charts for years; and between the continued radio play of the duo's biggest hits, and the inevitable discovery of their catalog by successive new waves of junior high and high school students, those five LPs stood among the most profitable parts of the Columbia Records back catalog, rivaling Bob Dylan's much larger library in sheer numbers. Columbia might have gone years longer without compiling the duo's hits, but then, in June of 1972, Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel did something totally unexpected -- in the midst of Simon's still-emerging solo career (and the careful crafting of his identity as a single act), and Garfunkel's re-identification of himself as an actor, the two reunited for one night, to do a benefit performance at New York's Madison Square Garden for the presidential candidacy of Senator George McGovern. (The latter event also took on a life of its own, as the first widely available Simon & Garfunkel concert bootleg, with terrible sound but capturing for posterity what had to be one of the funniest moments of their stage history, when Simon, attempting to suppress his laughter, remarks in connection with requests being called out, that someone "wants to hear "Voices of Old People" from Bookends). The performance was widely publicized, both before and after the event -- McGovern had captured the hearts and imaginations of tens of millions of high school and college students around the United States that spring, and this reviewer can attest to the fact that millions of people who were not at that show felt like they were there in spirit. It was inevitable that Columbia would want to put out a new Simon & Garfunkel release to take advantage of the renewed attention and excitement surrounding the duo, and they probably could have gotten away with a straight greatest-hits collection; but thanks to some inspiration and cooperation between the label and the artists, Greatest Hits went far beyond that. Nine of the tracks on the 14-song LP did, indeed, comprise the duo's biggest hits -- including "Bridge Over Troubled Water," "Mrs. Robinson," and "The Sounds of Silence" -- in their familiar studio versions; but interspersed between them were previously unheard live recordings of "For Emily, Whenever I May Find Her," "The 59th Street Bridge Song (Feelin' Groovy)," "Homeward Bound," and "Kathy's Song," plus an alternate take of "America." At that time, Simon & Garfunkel had never released a live album, and as it happened, at least four of those five were among the most personal songs in the duo's repertory -- songs that millions of fans responded to individually (as opposed to the mass appeal of the pair's hit singles). The fact that they were present as excellent live performances made the appeal of this record irresistible to fans at every level, from the most casual to the most serious and dedicated. It was a sign of just how much they were loved and missed (and, perhaps, needed?) that without anything but that one unrecorded and untelevised benefit show to support its release, the record peaked at number five on the Billboard charts. And a couple of years later, it joined their original five albums as a perennial catalog favorite. And it still holds up -- it touches all the right buttons, providing an overview of the duo's most popular songs, but with those live cuts and the "America" outtake to make it essential in its own right, separate from the overview -- indeed, it manages to present both the duo's broader history, and their most widely appealing music, and their most intimate work, all seamlessly; only some interesting and ambitious singles that either hadn't stood the test of time ("Fakin' It") or were artistic blind alleys ("The Dangling Conversation"), were missing, along with "Punky's Dilemma," a perennial FM radio favorite that lay just below Columbia Records' and the duo's radar. All of that is the good part about this collection, which ought to get an unqualified rave -- the bad part, and the reason that it doesn't get that rave, is the sound quality, which was indifferent on the LP and worse on the CD, with sound that audibly cracks on parts of "The Sounds of Silence" and some of the other early studio cuts; Greatest Hits has begged for a sonic upgrade, and remastering from better sources, for two decades, and Columbia somehow missed the obvious opportunity to do this as part of either its Mastersound and SACD catalogs. It's the one caveat that anyone buying it should bear in mind.

    Track List

    1
    Mrs. Robinson
    Paul Simon
    Simon & Garfunkel
    4:02
    2
    For Emily, Whenever I May Find Her
    Paul Simon
    Simon & Garfunkel
    2:04
    3
    The Boxer
    Paul Simon
    Simon & Garfunkel
    5:07
    4
    The 59th Street Bridge Song (Feelin' Groovy)
    Paul Simon
    Simon & Garfunkel
    1:43
    5
    The Sound of Silence
    Paul Simon
    Simon & Garfunkel
    3:02
    6
    I Am a Rock
    Paul Simon
    Simon & Garfunkel
    2:50
    7
    Scarborough Fair/Canticle
    Art Garfunkel / Paul Simon
    Simon & Garfunkel
    3:08
    8
    Homeward Bound
    Paul Simon
    Simon & Garfunkel
    2:30
    9
    Bridge over Troubled Water
    Paul Simon
    Simon & Garfunkel
    4:52
    10
    America
    Paul Simon
    Simon & Garfunkel
    3:34
    11
    Kathy's Song
    Paul Simon
    Simon & Garfunkel
    3:16
    12
    El Condor Pasa (If I Could)
    Jorge Milchberg / Daniel Alomía Robles / Paul Simon
    Simon & Garfunkel
    3:06
    13
    Bookends Theme
    Paul Simon
    Simon & Garfunkel
    1:16
    14
    Cecilia
    Paul Simon
    Simon & Garfunkel
    2:55

    79 Iron Maiden - The Number of the Beast (1982)

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    Routinely ranked among the greatest heavy metal albums of all time, The Number of the Beast is the birth of Iron Maiden as we know it, a relentless metal machine lifted to soaring new heights by the arrival of erstwhile Samson frontman Bruce Dickinson. Dickinson's operatic performance here made him an instant metal icon, challenging even Rob Halford for bragging rights, and helped launch the band into the stratosphere. The Number of the Beast topped the charts in the U.K., but even more crucially -- with Judas Priest having moved into more commercial territory -- it also made Iron Maiden the band of choice for purists who wanted their metal uncompromised. Maiden took the basic blueprint Priest had created in the late '70s -- aggressive tempos, twin-guitar interplay, wide-ranging power vocals -- and cranked everything up faster and louder. The album's intensity never lets up, the musical technique is peerless for its time, and there isn't a truly unmemorable song in the bunch. Blessed with a singer who could drive home a melody in grandiose fashion, Steve Harris' writing gets more ambitious, largely abandoning the street violence of old in favor of fittingly epic themes drawn from history, science fiction, and horror. The exceptions are "22 Acacia Avenue," a sequel to "Charlotte the Harlot" that sounds written for Di'Anno's range, and the street-crime tale "Gangland," which Harris didn't write; though the punk influences largely left with Di'Anno, these two definitely recall the Maiden of old. As for the new, two of the band's (and, for that matter, heavy metal's) all-time signature songs are here. The anthemic "Run to the Hills" dramatized the conquest of the Native Americans and became the band's first Top Ten U.K. single. It features Maiden's trademark galloping rhythm, which in this case serves to underscore the images of warriors on horseback. Meanwhile, the title track's odd-meter time signature keeps the listener just slightly off balance and unsettled, leading into the most blood-curdling Dickinson scream on record; the lyrics, based on nothing more than Harris' nightmare after watching a horror movie, naturally provoked hysterical accusations of Satan worship (which, in turn, naturally provoked sales). "Hallowed Be Thy Name" is perhaps the most celebrated of the band's extended epics; it's the tale of a prisoner about to be hanged, featuring some of Harris' most philosophical lyrics. It opens with a superbly doomy atmosphere before giving way to a succession of memorable instrumental lines and an impassioned performance by Dickinson; despite all the tempo changes, the transitions never feel jarring. Elsewhere, "The Prisoner" is a catchy retelling of the hit British TV series, and "Children of the Damned" is a slower, heavier number patterned after the downtempo moments of Dio-era Black Sabbath. CD remasters integrate "Total Eclipse," first released as the B-side of "Run to the Hills," into the running order. Though some moments on The Number of the Beast are clearly stronger than others, the album as a whole represented a high-water mark for heavy metal, striking a balance between accessible melodicism and challenging technique and intensity. Everything fell into place for Iron Maiden here at exactly the right time, and the result certainly ranks among the top five most essential heavy metal albums ever recorded. A cornerstone of the genre.

    Track List

    1
    Invaders
    Steve Harris
    Iron Maiden
    3:25
    2
    Children of the Damned
    Steve Harris
    Iron Maiden
    4:35
    3
    The Prisoner
    Steve Harris / Adrian Smith
    Iron Maiden
    6:04
    4
    22 Acacia Avenue
    Steve Harris / Adrian Smith
    Iron Maiden
    6:37
    5
    The Number of the Beast
    Steve Harris
    Iron Maiden
    4:52
    6
    Run to the Hills
    Steve Harris
    Iron Maiden
    3:54
    7
    Gangland
    Clive Burr / Steve Harris / Adrian Smith
    Iron Maiden
    3:48
    8
    Total Eclipse
    Clive Burr / Paul Di'Anno / Steve Harris
    Iron Maiden
    4:26
    9
    Hallowed Be Thy Name
    Steve Harris
    Iron Maiden
    7:14

    78 Rush - Rush (1974)

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    Rush's self-titled debut is about as uncharacteristic of their renowned heavy progressive rock (perfected on such future releases as Hemispheres, Moving Pictures, etc.) as you can get. Instead of complex arrangements and thoughtful lyrics, Rush sounds almost identical to Led Zeppelin throughout -- bluesy riffs merged with "baby, baby" lyrics. The main reason for the album's different sound and direction is that their lyricist/drummer, Neil Peart, was not in the band yet, skinsman John Rutsey rounds out the original line-up, also consisting of Geddy Lee (bass/vocals) and Alex Lifeson (guitar). It's nearly impossible to hear the anthemic "Finding My Way" and not picture Robert Plant shrieking away, or Jimmy Page riffing on the jamfest "Working Man," but Rush was still in their formative stages. There's no denying that Lee and Lifeson were already strong instrumentalists, but such predictable compositions as "In the Mood" and "What You're Doing" prove that Peart was undoubtedly the missing piece to the puzzle. While longtime Rush fans can appreciate their debut because they never returned to this style, newcomers should stick with their classics from later years.

    Track List

    1
    Finding My Way
    Geddy Lee / Alex Lifeson
    Rush
    5:05
    2
    Need Some Love
    Geddy Lee / Alex Lifeson
    Rush
    2:19
    3
    Take a Friend
    Geddy Lee / Alex Lifeson
    Rush
    4:24
    4
    Here Again
    Geddy Lee / Alex Lifeson
    Rush
    7:34
    5
    What You're Doing
    Geddy Lee / Alex Lifeson
    Rush
    4:22
    6
    In the Mood
    Geddy Lee
    Rush
    3:33
    7
    Before and After
    Geddy Lee / Alex Lifeson
    Rush
    5:34
    8
    Working Man
    Geddy Lee / Alex Lifeson
    Rush
    7:10

    77 Eminem - Recovery (2010)

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    With Recovery it becomes obvious that Eminem's richest albums aren't necessarily his most structurally sound, which isn't much of a surprise when considering the rapper's full-on embrace of flaws and contradictions. This lean, mean bipolar machine began life as Relapse 2, but when Shady decided he wasn't really Shady at the moment and that he was no longer keen on Relapse -- or the last two albums as he states on “Talkin' 2 Myself” -- it became Marshall Mathers time again, so damn any 11th hour issues. This results in an album where a shameless but killer Michael J. Fox punch line (“The world will stop spinnin’ and Michael J. Fox‘ll come to a standstill” from “Cold Wind”) is followed by a song with another, less effective MJF joke (“Make like Michael J. Fox in your drawers, playin' with an Etch-A-Sketch”), although that song is the lurching heavy metal monster “Won't Back Down” with P!nk, and it could be used as the lead-in to “Lose Yourself” on any ego-boosting mixtape. Following an apology for your recent work with a damnation of critics and haters is just sloppy; taking off the skits and then overstuffing your album by a track or two is undermining what's good; and the beats here are collectively just a B+ with only one production (the so good “So Bad”) coming from Dr. Dre. Add to that the detractor idea that being privy to the man's therapy sessions just isn't compelling anymore and the only persuasive moments remaining are the highlights, but fans can feed on the energy, the renewed sense of purpose, and Marshall doing whatever the hell he wants, up to and including shoehorning a grand D12-like comedy number ("W.T.P.," which stands for "White Trash Party") into this emotionally heavy album. It’s fascinating when Em admits “Hatred was flowin’ through my veins, on the verge of goin’ insane/I almost made a song dissin’ Lil Wayne” and then “Thank God I didn’t do it/I’da had my ass handed to me, and I knew it” before sparring with said Weezy on the Haddaway-sampling “No Love.” When the recovery-minded “Going Through Changes” gets back on the wagon by sampling Black Sabbath’s very druggy “Changes” it’s a brilliant and layered idea that’s executed with poignant lyrics on top. Add the man at his most profound (the gigantic hit “Not Afraid”) and his most profane (“You wanna get graphic? We can go the scenic route/You couldn’t make a bulimic puke on a piece of corn and peanut poop” from “On Fire”) plus one of thickest lyric booklets out of any of his albums and the fans who really listen are instantly on board. It may be flawed and the rapper’s attitude is sometimes one step ahead of his output, but he hasn’t sounded this unfiltered and proud since The Marshall Mathers LP, so to hell with refinement -- bring on the hunger and spirit of 8 Mile.

    Track List

    1
    Cold Wind Blows
    Marshall Mathers
    Eminem
    5:03
    2
    Talkin' 2 Myself
    Marshall Mathers
    Eminem
    feat. Kobe 5:00
    3
    On Fire
    Marshall Mathers
    Eminem
    3:33
    4
    Won't Back Down
    Marshall Mathers
    Eminem
    feat. P!nk 4:25
    5
    W.T.P.
    Marshall Mathers
    Eminem
    3:58
    6
    Going Through Changes
    Geezer Butler / Tony Iommi / Marshall Mathers / Ozzy Osbourne / Bill Ward
    Eminem
    4:58
    7
    Not Afraid
    Marshall Mathers
    Eminem
    4:08
    8
    Seduction
    Marshall Mathers
    Eminem
    4:35
    9
    No Love
    Marshall Mathers
    Eminem
    feat. Lil Wayne 4:59
    10
    Space Bound
    Marshall Mathers
    Eminem
    4:38
    11
    Cinderella Man
    Marshall Mathers
    Eminem
    4:39
    12
    25 to Life
    Marshall Mathers
    Eminem
    4:01
    13
    So Bad
    Marshall Mathers / Andre Young
    Eminem
    5:25
    14
    Almost Famous
    Marshall Mathers
    Eminem
    4:52
    15
    Love the Way You Lie
    Marshall Mathers
    Eminem
    feat. Rihanna 4:23
    16
    You're Never Over
    Marshall Mathers
    Eminem
    5:05
    17
    [Untitled Hidden Track]
    M. Crawford / Marshall Mathers
    Eminem
    3:14

    76 The Jesus and Mary Chain - Psychocandy (1985)

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    Arguably Psychocandy is an album with one trick and one trick alone -- Beach Boys melodies meet Velvet Underground feedback and beats, all cranked up to ten and beyond, along with plenty of echo. However, what a trick it is. Following up on the promise of the earliest singles, the Jesus and Mary Chain with Psychocandy arguably created a movement without meaning to, one that itself caused echoes in everything from bliss-out shoegaze to snotty Britpop and back again. The best tracks were without question those singles, anti-pop yet pure pop at the same time: "Just Like Honey," starting off like the Ronettes heard in a canyon and weirdly beautiful with its bells, "You Trip Me Up" and its slinking sense of cool, and most especially "Never Understand." Storming down like a rumble of bricks wrapped in cotton candy and getting more and more frenetic at the end, when there's nothing but howls and screaming noise, it's one hell of a track. However, at least in terms of sheer sonic violence and mayhem, most of the other cuts were pretty hard to beat, as sprawling, amped-up messes like "The Living End" (which later inspired both a band and a movie title) and "In a Hole." "My Little Underground" is actually the secret gem on the album, with a great snarling guitar start, an almost easygoing melody and a great stuttering chorus -- not quite the Who but not quite anything else. What the Reids sing about -- entirely interchangeable combinations regarding girls, sex, drugs, speed, and boredom in more or less equal measure -- is nothing compared to the perfectly disaffected way those sentiments are delivered. Bobby Gillespie's "hit the drums and then hit them again" style makes Moe Tucker seem like Neil Peart, but arguably in terms of sheer economy he doesn't need to do any more.

    Track List

    1
    Just Like Honey
    The Jesus and Mary Chain
    The Jesus and Mary Chain
    3:01
    2
    The Living Dead
    The Jesus and Mary Chain
    2:15
    3
    Taste The Floor
    The Jesus and Mary Chain
    2:57
    4
    The Hardest Walk
    The Jesus and Mary Chain
    2:39
    5
    Cut Dead
    The Jesus and Mary Chain
    2:45
    6
    In A Hole
    The Jesus and Mary Chain
    3:02
    7
    Taste Of Cindy
    The Jesus and Mary Chain
    1:42
    8
    Never Understand
    The Jesus and Mary Chain
    2:58
    9
    Inside Me
    The Jesus and Mary Chain
    3:09
    10
    Sowing Seeds
    The Jesus and Mary Chain
    2:50
    11
    My Little Underground
    The Jesus and Mary Chain
    2:31
    12
    You Trip Me Up
    The Jesus and Mary Chain
    2:26
    13
    Something's Wrong
    The Jesus and Mary Chain
    4:02
    14
    It's So Hard
    The Jesus and Mary Chain
    2:38

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  3. boki71

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    85 Metallica - Kill 'Em All (1983)

    [​IMG]

    The true birth of thrash. On Kill 'Em All, Metallica fuses the intricate riffing of New Wave of British Heavy Metal bands like Judas Priest, Iron Maiden, and Diamond Head with the velocity of Motörhead and hardcore punk. James Hetfield's highly technical rhythm guitar style drives most of the album, setting new standards of power, precision, and stamina. But really, the rest of the band is just as dexterous, playing with tightly controlled fury even at the most ridiculously fast tempos. There are already several extended, multi-sectioned compositions foreshadowing the band's later progressive epics, though these are driven by adrenaline, not texture. A few tributes to heavy metal itself are a bit dated lyrically; like Diamond Head, the band's biggest influence, Kill 'Em All's most effective tone is one of supernatural malevolence -- as pure sound, the record is already straight from the pits of hell. Ex-member Dave Mustaine co-wrote four of the original ten tracks, but the material all sounds of a piece. And actually, anyone who worked backward through the band's catalog might not fully appreciate the impact of Kill 'Em All when it first appeared -- unlike later releases, there simply isn't much musical variation (apart from a lyrical bass solo from Cliff Burton). The band's musical ambition also grew rapidly, so today, Kill 'Em All sounds more like the foundation for greater things to come. But that doesn't take anything away from how fresh it sounded upon first release, and time hasn't dulled the giddy rush of excitement in these performances. Frightening, awe-inspiring, and absolutely relentless, Kill 'Em All is pure destructive power, executed with jaw-dropping levels of scientific precision. [An Elektra reissue added the cover songs "Blitzkrieg" and "Am I Evil?" from the European Creeping Death EP, which were later deleted and included on Garage, Inc.]

    Track List

    1
    Hit the Lights
    James Hetfield / Lars Ulrich
    Metallica
    4:17
    2
    The Four Horsemen
    James Hetfield / Dave Mustaine / Lars Ulrich
    Metallica
    7:08
    3
    Motorbreath
    James Hetfield
    Metallica
    3:03
    4
    Jump in the Fire
    James Hetfield / Dave Mustaine / Lars Ulrich
    Metallica
    4:50
    5
    (Anesthesia) Pulling Teeth
    Cliff Burton
    Metallica
    3:27
    6
    Whiplash
    James Hetfield / Lars Ulrich
    Metallica
    4:06
    7
    Phantom Lord
    James Hetfield / Dave Mustaine / Lars Ulrich
    Metallica
    4:52
    8
    No Remorse
    James Hetfield / Lars Ulrich
    Metallica
    6:24
    9
    Seek & Destroy
    James Hetfield / Lars Ulrich
    Metallica
    6:50
    10
    Metal Militia
    James Hetfield / Dave Mustaine / Lars Ulrich
    Metallica
    6:06

    84 Billy Joel - The Stranger (1977)

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    Billy Joel teamed with Phil Ramone, a famed engineer who had just scored his first producing hits with Art Garfunkel's Breakaway and Paul Simon's Still Crazy After All These Years for The Stranger, his follow-up to Turnstiles. Joel still favored big, sweeping melodies, but Ramone convinced him to streamline his arrangements and clean up the production. The results aren't necessarily revelatory, since he covered so much ground on Turnstiles, but the commercialism of The Stranger is a bit of a surprise. None of his ballads have been as sweet or slick as "Just the Way You Are"; he never had created a rocker as bouncy or infectious as "Only the Good Die Young"; and the glossy production of "She's Always a Woman" disguises its latent misogynist streak. Joel balanced such radio-ready material with a series of New York vignettes, seemingly inspired by Springsteen's working-class fables and clearly intended to be the artistic centerpieces of the album. They do provide The Stranger with the feel of a concept album, yet there is no true thematic connection between the pieces, and his lyrics are often vague or mean-spirited. His lyrical shortcomings are overshadowed by his musical strengths. Even if his melodies sound more Broadway than Beatles -- the epic suite "Scenes From an Italian Restaurant" feels like a show-stopping closer -- there's no denying that the melodies of each song on The Stranger are memorable, so much so that they strengthen the weaker portions of the album. Joel rarely wrote a set of songs better than those on The Stranger, nor did he often deliver an album as consistently listenable.

    Track List

    1
    Movin' Out (Anthony's Song)
    Billy Joel
    Billy Joel
    3:30
    2
    The Stranger
    Billy Joel
    Billy Joel
    5:10
    3
    Just the Way You Are
    Billy Joel
    Billy Joel
    4:50
    4
    Scenes from an Italian Restaurant
    Billy Joel
    Billy Joel
    7:37
    5
    Vienna
    Billy Joel
    Billy Joel
    3:34
    6
    Only the Good Die Young
    Billy Joel
    Billy Joel
    3:55
    7
    She's Always a Woman
    Billy Joel
    Billy Joel
    3:21
    8
    Get It Right the First Time
    Billy Joel
    Billy Joel
    3:57
    9
    Everybody Has a Dream
    Billy Joel
    Billy Joel
    9:08

    83 Metallica - Master of Puppets (1983)

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    Even though Master of Puppets didn't take as gigantic a leap forward as Ride the Lightning, it was the band's greatest achievement, hailed as a masterpiece by critics far outside heavy metal's core audience. It was also a substantial hit, reaching the Top 30 and selling three million copies despite absolutely nonexistent airplay. Instead of a radical reinvention, Master of Puppets is a refinement of past innovations. In fact, it's possible to compare Ride the Lightning and Master of Puppets song for song and note striking similarities between corresponding track positions on each record (although Lightning's closing instrumental has been bumped up to next-to-last in Master's running order). That hint of conservatism is really the only conceivable flaw here. Though it isn't as startling as Ride the Lightning, Master of Puppets feels more unified, both thematically and musically. Everything about it feels blown up to epic proportions (indeed, the songs are much longer on average), and the band feels more in control of its direction. You'd never know it by the lyrics, though -- in one way or another, nearly every song on Master of Puppets deals with the fear of powerlessness. Sometimes they're about hypocritical authority (military and religious leaders), sometimes primal, uncontrollable human urges (drugs, insanity, rage), and, in true H.P. Lovecraft fashion, sometimes monsters. Yet by bookending the album with two slices of thrash mayhem ("Battery" and "Damage, Inc."), the band reigns triumphant through sheer force -- of sound, of will, of malice. The arrangements are thick and muscular, and the material varies enough in texture and tempo to hold interest through all its twists and turns. Some critics have called Master of Puppets the best heavy metal album ever recorded; if it isn't, it certainly comes close.

    Track List

    1
    Battery
    James Hetfield / Lars Ulrich
    Metallica
    5:10
    2
    Master of Puppets
    Cliff Burton / Kirk Hammett / James Hetfield / Lars Ulrich
    Metallica
    8:38
    3
    The Thing That Should Not Be
    Kirk Hammett / James Hetfield / Lars Ulrich
    Metallica
    6:32
    4
    Welcome Home (Sanitarium)
    Kirk Hammett / James Hetfield / Lars Ulrich
    Metallica
    6:28
    5
    Disposable Heroes
    Kirk Hammett / James Hetfield / Lars Ulrich
    Metallica
    8:14
    6
    Leper Messiah
    James Hetfield / Lars Ulrich
    Metallica
    5:38
    7
    Orion
    Cliff Burton / James Hetfield / Lars Ulrich
    Metallica
    8:12
    8
    Damage, Inc.
    Cliff Burton / Kirk Hammett / James Hetfield / Lars Ulrich
    Metallica
    5:08

    82 Green Day - American Idiot (2004)

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    It's a bit tempting to peg Green Day's sprawling, ambitious, brilliant seventh album, American Idiot, as their version of a Who album, the next logical step forward from the Kinks-inspired popcraft of their underrated 2000 effort, Warning, but things aren't quite that simple. American Idiot is an unapologetic, unabashed rock opera, a form that Pete Townshend pioneered with Tommy, but Green Day doesn't use that for a blueprint as much as they use the Who's mini-opera "A Quick One, While He's Away," whose whirlwind succession of 90-second songs isn't only emulated on two song suites here, but provides the template for the larger 13-song cycle. But the Who are only one of many inspirations on this audacious, immensely entertaining album. The story of St. Jimmy has an arc similar to Hüsker Dü's landmark punk-opera Zen Arcade, while the music has grandiose flourishes straight out of both Queen and Rocky Horror Picture Show (the '50s pastiche "Rock and Roll Girlfriend" is punk rock Meat Loaf), all tied together with a nervy urgency and a political passion reminiscent of the Clash, or all the anti-Reagan American hardcore bands of the '80s. These are just the clearest touchstones for American Idiot, but reducing the album to its influences gives the inaccurate impression that this is no more than a patchwork quilt of familiar sounds, when it's an idiosyncratic, visionary work in its own right. First of all, part of Green Day's appeal is how they have personalized the sounds of the past, making time-honored guitar rock traditions seem fresh, even vital. With their first albums, they styled themselves after first-generation punk they were too young to hear firsthand, and as their career progressed, the group not only synthesized these influences into something distinctive, but chief songwriter Billie Joe Armstrong turned into a muscular, versatile songwriter in his own right.

    Warning illustrated their growing musical acumen quite impressively, but here, the music isn't only tougher, it's fluid and, better still, it fuels the anger, disillusionment, heartbreak, frustration, and scathing wit at the core of American Idiot. And one of the truly startling things about American Idiot is how the increased musicality of the band is matched by Armstrong's incisive, cutting lyrics, which effectively convey the paranoia and fear of living in American in days after 9/11, but also veer into moving, intimate small-scale character sketches. There's a lot to absorb here, and cynics might dismiss it after one listen as a bit of a mess when it's really a rich, multi-faceted work, one that is bracing upon the first spin and grows in stature and becomes more addictive with each repeated play. Like all great concept albums, American Idiot works on several different levels. It can be taken as a collection of great songs -- songs that are as visceral or as poignant as Green Day at their best, songs that resonate outside of the larger canvas of the story, as the fiery anti-Dubya title anthem proves -- but these songs have a different, more lasting impact when taken as a whole. While its breakneck, freewheeling musicality has many inspirations, there really aren't many records like American Idiot (bizarrely enough, the Fiery Furnaces' Blueberry Boat is one of the closest, at least on a sonic level, largely because both groups draw deeply from the kaleidoscopic "A Quick One"). In its musical muscle and sweeping, politically charged narrative, it's something of a masterpiece, and one of the few -- if not the only -- records of 2004 to convey what it feels like to live in the strange, bewildering America of the early 2000s.

    Track List

    1
    American Idiot
    Billie Joe Armstrong / Green Day
    Green Day
    2:54
    2
    Jesus of Suburbia: Jesus of Suburbia/City of the Damned/I Don't Care
    Billie Joe Armstrong / Green Day
    Green Day
    9:08
    3
    Holiday
    Billie Joe Armstrong / Green Day
    Green Day
    3:52
    4
    Boulevard of Broken Dreams
    Billie Joe Armstrong / Green Day
    Green Day
    4:20
    5
    Are We the Waiting
    Billie Joe Armstrong / Green Day
    Green Day
    2:42
    6
    St. Jimmy
    Billie Joe Armstrong / Green Day
    Green Day
    2:55
    7
    Give Me Novacaine
    Billie Joe Armstrong / Green Day
    Green Day
    3:25
    8
    She's a Rebel
    Billie Joe Armstrong / Green Day
    Green Day
    2:00
    9
    Extraordinary Girl
    Billie Joe Armstrong / Green Day
    Green Day
    3:33
    10
    Letter Bomb
    Billie Joe Armstrong / Green Day
    Green Day
    4:06
    11
    Wake Me Up When September Ends
    Billie Joe Armstrong / Green Day
    Green Day
    4:45
    12
    Homecoming: The Death of St. Jimmy/East 12th St./Nobody Likes You/Rock
    Billie Joe Armstrong / Tre Cool / Green Day / Mike Dirnt
    Green Day
    9:18
    13
    Whatsername
    Billie Joe Armstrong / Green Day
    Green Day
    6:44

    81 Led Zeppelin - The Song Remains The Same (1976)(2CD)

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    Commonly dismissed as a disappointment upon its initial release, the soundtrack to Led Zeppelin's concert movie The Song Remains the Same is one of those '70s records that has aged better than its reputation -- it's the kind of thing that's more valuable as the band recedes into history than it was at the time, as it documents its time so thoroughly. Of course, that time would be the mid-'70s, when the band was golden gods, selling out stadiums across America and indulging their wildest desires both on and off stage. It was the kind of excess that creates either myth or madness, and this 1976 live album -- comprised of highlights from their three shows at Madison Square Garden during July 1973 -- has its fair share of both, as Zeppelin sounds both magnificent and murky as they blow up songs from their first five albums to a ridiculously grand scale. This is not the vigorous, vicious band documented on the subsequently released live BBC Sessions or the majestic might of the 2003 live album How the West Was Won and its accompanying eponymous DVD, where the band still sounded tight even when they stretched out for 20 minutes. Here, on a show documented just about 18 months after those on How the West, the group is starting to let their status as stars go to their head ever so slightly. They no longer sound hungry; they sound settled, satisfied at their status as rock overlord, and since a huge part of Zeppelin's appeal is their sheer scale, hearing them at their most oversized on The Song Remains the Same is not without its charm. This, more than any of their studio albums, captures both the grandiosity and entitlement that earned the band scorn among certain quarters of rock critics and punk rockers in the mid-'70s, which makes it a valuable historical document in an odd way, as the studio records are such magnificent constructions and the archival live albums so powerful. Plus, there is a certain sinister charm to the sheer spectacle chronicled on The Song Remains the Same, particularly in the greatly expanded 2007 reissue, which adds six previously unreleased tracks, helping pump up this already oversized album into something truly larger than life. At this stage, Zeppelin only seemed concerned with pleasing themselves, but they only did so because they could -- others tried to mimic them, but nobody could get the sheer size of their sound, which was different yet equally monstrous on-stage as it was on record. It wasn't as consistent on-stage as it was on record -- a half-hour "Dazed and Confused" may be the stuff of legend, but it's still a chore to get through -- but the very fact that Led Zeppelin could take things so far is part of their mystique, and nowhere is that penchant of excess better heard than on The Song Remains the Same.

    Track List (Remastered Version from 2007)

    disc 1

    1
    Rock and Roll
    John Bonham / John Paul Jones / Jimmy Page / Robert Plant
    Led Zeppelin
    4:03
    2
    Celebration Day
    John Paul Jones / Jimmy Page / Robert Plant
    Led Zeppelin
    3:49
    3
    The Song Remains the Same
    Jimmy Page / Robert Plant
    Led Zeppelin
    5:53
    4
    Rain Song
    Jimmy Page / Robert Plant
    Led Zeppelin
    8:25
    5
    Dazed and Confused
    Jimmy Page
    Led Zeppelin
    26:52

    disc 2

    1
    No Quarter
    John Paul Jones / Jimmy Page / Robert Plant
    Led Zeppelin
    12:30
    2
    Stairway to Heaven
    Jimmy Page / Robert Plant
    Led Zeppelin
    10:57
    3
    Moby Dick
    John Bonham / John Paul Jones / Jimmy Page
    Led Zeppelin
    12:46
    4
    Whole Lotta Love
    John Bonham / Willie Dixon / John Paul Jones / Jimmy Page / Robert Plant
    Led Zeppelin
    14:25


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    90 The Smiths - The Queen Is Dead (1986)

    [​IMG]

    Meat Is Murder may have been a holding pattern, but The Queen Is Dead is the Smiths' great leap forward, taking the band to new musical and lyrical heights. Opening with the storming title track, The Queen Is Dead is a harder-rocking record than anything the Smiths had attempted before, but that's only on a relative scale -- although the backbeat is more pronounced, the group certainly doesn't rock in a conventional sense. Instead, Johnny Marr has created a dense web of guitars, alternating from the minor-key rush of "Bigmouth Strikes Again" and the faux rockabilly of "Vicar in a Tutu" to the bouncy acoustic pop of "Cemetry Gates" and "The Boy With the Thorn in His Side," as well as the lovely melancholy of "I Know It's Over" and "There Is a Light That Never Goes Out." And the rich musical bed provides Morrissey with the support for his finest set of lyrics. Shattering the myth that he is a self-pitying sap, Morrissey delivers a devastating set of clever, witty satires of British social mores, intellectualism, class, and even himself. He also crafts some of his finest, most affecting songs, particularly in the wistful "The Boy With the Thorn in His Side" and the epic "There Is a Light That Never Goes Out," two masterpieces that provide the foundation for a remarkable album.

    Track List

    1
    The Queen Is Dead (Take Me Back to Dear Old Blighty)
    Johnny Marr / Morrissey
    The Smiths
    6:23
    2
    Frankly, Mr. Shankly
    Johnny Marr / Morrissey
    The Smiths
    2:17
    3
    I Know It's Over
    Johnny Marr / Morrissey
    The Smiths
    5:48
    4
    Never Had No One Ever
    Johnny Marr / Morrissey
    The Smiths
    3:36
    5
    Cemetry Gates
    Johnny Marr / Morrissey
    The Smiths
    2:39
    6
    Bigmouth Strikes Again
    Johnny Marr / Morrissey
    The Smiths
    3:12
    7
    The Boy With the Thorn in His Side
    Johnny Marr / Morrissey
    The Smiths
    3:15
    8
    Vicar in a Tutu
    Johnny Marr / Morrissey
    The Smiths
    2:21
    9
    There Is a Light That Never Goes Out
    Johnny Marr / Morrissey
    The Smiths
    4:02
    10
    Some Girls Are Bigger Than Others
    Johnny Marr / Morrissey
    The Smiths
    3:14

    89 Nirvana - In Utero (1993)

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    Nirvana probably hired Steve Albini to produce In Utero with the hopes of creating their own Surfer Rosa, or at least shoring up their indie cred after becoming a pop phenomenon with a glossy punk record. In Utero, of course, turned out to be their last record, and it's hard not to hear it as Kurt Cobain's suicide note, since Albini's stark, uncompromising sound provides the perfect setting for Cobain's bleak, even nihilistic, lyrics. Even if the album wasn't a literal suicide note, it was certainly a conscious attempt to shed their audience -- an attempt that worked, by the way, since the record had lost its momentum when Cobain died in the spring of 1994. Even though the band tempered some of Albini's extreme tactics in a remix, the record remains a deliberately alienating experience, front-loaded with many of its strongest songs, then descending into a series of brief, dissonant squalls before concluding with "All Apologies," which only gets sadder with each passing year. Throughout it all, Cobain's songwriting is typically haunting, and its best moments rank among his finest work, but the over-amped dynamicism of the recording seems like a way to camouflage his dispiritedness -- as does the fact that he consigned such great songs as "Verse Chorus Verse" and "I Hate Myself and Want to Die" to compilations, when they would have fit, even illuminated the themes of In Utero. Even without those songs, In Utero remains a shattering listen, whether it's viewed as Cobain's farewell letter or self-styled audience alienation. Few other records are as willfully difficult as this.

    Track List

    1
    Serve the Servants
    Kurt Cobain
    Nirvana
    3:34
    2
    Scentless Apprentice
    Kurt Cobain / Dave Grohl / Krist Novoselic
    Nirvana
    3:47
    3
    Heart Shaped Box
    Kurt Cobain
    Nirvana
    4:39
    4
    Rape Me
    Kurt Cobain
    Nirvana
    2:49
    5
    Frances Farmer Will Have Her Revenge on Seattle
    Kurt Cobain
    Nirvana
    4:07
    6
    Dumb
    Kurt Cobain
    Nirvana
    2:29
    7
    Very Ape
    Kurt Cobain
    Nirvana
    1:55
    8
    Milk It
    Kurt Cobain
    Nirvana
    3:52
    9
    Pennyroyal Tea
    Kurt Cobain
    Nirvana
    3:36
    10
    Radio Friendly Unit Shifter
    Kurt Cobain
    Nirvana
    4:49
    11
    Tourette's
    Kurt Cobain
    Nirvana
    1:33
    12
    All Apologies
    Kurt Cobain
    Nirvana
    3:50

    88 The Beatles - The Beatles (White Album) (1968)

    [​IMG]

    Each song on the sprawling double album The Beatles is an entity to itself, as the band touches on anything and everything it can. This makes for a frustratingly scattershot record or a singularly gripping musical experience, depending on your view, but what makes the so-called White Album interesting is its mess. Never before had a rock record been so self-reflective, or so ironic; the Beach Boys send-up "Back in the U.S.S.R." and the British blooze parody "Yer Blues" are delivered straight-faced, so it's never clear if these are affectionate tributes or wicked satires. Lennon turns in two of his best ballads with "Dear Prudence" and "Julia"; scours the Abbey Road vaults for the musique concrète collage "Revolution 9"; pours on the schmaltz for Ringo's closing number, "Good Night"; celebrates the Beatles cult with "Glass Onion"; and, with "Cry Baby Cry," rivals Syd Barrett. McCartney doesn't reach quite as far, yet his songs are stunning -- the music hall romp "Honey Pie," the mock country of "Rocky Raccoon," the ska-inflected "Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da," and the proto-metal roar of "Helter Skelter." Clearly, the Beatles' two main songwriting forces were no longer on the same page, but neither were George and Ringo. Harrison still had just two songs per LP, but it's clear from "While My Guitar Gently Weeps," the canned soul of "Savoy Truffle," the haunting "Long, Long, Long," and even the silly "Piggies" that he had developed into a songwriter who deserved wider exposure. And Ringo turns in a delight with his first original, the lumbering country-carnival stomp "Don't Pass Me By." None of it sounds like it was meant to share album space together, but somehow The Beatles creates its own style and sound through its mess.

    Track List

    disc 1

    1
    Back in the U.S.S.R.
    John Lennon / Paul McCartney
    The Beatles
    2:43
    2
    Dear Prudence
    John Lennon / Paul McCartney
    The Beatles
    3:55
    3
    Glass Onion
    John Lennon / Paul McCartney
    The Beatles
    2:17
    4
    Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da
    John Lennon / Paul McCartney
    The Beatles
    3:08
    5
    Wild Honey Pie
    John Lennon / Paul McCartney
    The Beatles
    0:52
    6
    The Continuing Story of Bungalow Bill
    John Lennon / Paul McCartney
    The Beatles
    3:14
    7
    While My Guitar Gently Weeps
    George Harrison
    The Beatles
    4:44
    8
    Happiness Is a Warm Gun
    John Lennon / Paul McCartney
    The Beatles
    2:44
    9
    Martha My Dear
    John Lennon / Paul McCartney
    The Beatles
    2:28
    10
    I'm So Tired
    John Lennon / Paul McCartney
    The Beatles
    2:03
    11
    Blackbird
    John Lennon / Paul McCartney
    The Beatles
    2:18
    12
    Piggies
    George Harrison
    The Beatles
    2:04
    13
    Rocky Raccoon
    John Lennon / Paul McCartney
    The Beatles
    3:33
    14
    Don't Pass Me By
    Richard Starkey
    The Beatles
    3:50
    15
    Why Don't We Do It in the Road?
    John Lennon / Paul McCartney
    The Beatles
    1:41
    16
    I Will
    John Lennon / Paul McCartney
    The Beatles
    1:45
    17
    Julia
    John Lennon / Paul McCartney
    The Beatles
    2:56

    disc 2

    1
    Birthday
    John Lennon / Paul McCartney
    The Beatles
    2:43
    2
    Yer Blues
    John Lennon / Paul McCartney
    The Beatles
    4:00
    3
    Mother Nature's Son
    John Lennon / Paul McCartney
    The Beatles
    2:48
    4
    Everybody's Got Something to Hide Except Me and My Monkey
    John Lennon / Paul McCartney
    The Beatles
    2:24
    5
    Sexy Sadie
    John Lennon / Paul McCartney
    The Beatles
    3:15
    6
    Helter Skelter
    John Lennon / Paul McCartney
    The Beatles
    4:29
    7
    Long, Long, Long
    George Harrison
    The Beatles
    3:06
    8
    Revolution 1
    John Lennon / Paul McCartney
    The Beatles
    4:15
    9
    Honey Pie
    John Lennon / Paul McCartney
    The Beatles
    2:41
    10
    Savoy Truffle
    George Harrison
    The Beatles
    2:54
    11
    Cry Baby Cry
    John Lennon / Paul McCartney
    The Beatles
    3:02
    12
    Revolution 9
    John Lennon / Paul McCartney
    The Beatles
    8:22
    13
    Good Night
    John Lennon / Paul McCartney
    The Beatles
    3:15
    14

    87 Smashing Pumpkins - Siamese Dream (1993)

    [​IMG]

    While Gish had placed the Smashing Pumpkins on the "most promising artist" list for many, troubles were threatening to break the band apart. Singer/guitarist/leader Billy Corgan was battling a severe case of writer's block and was in a deep state of depression brought on by a relationship in turmoil; drummer Jimmy Chamberlin was addicted to hard drugs; and bassist D'Arcy and guitarist James Iha severed their romantic relationship. The sessions for their sophomore effort, Siamese Dream, were wrought with friction -- Corgan eventually played almost all the instruments himself (except for percussion). Some say strife and tension produces the best music, and it certainly helped make Siamese Dream one of the finest alt-rock albums of all time. Instead of following Nirvana's punk rock route, Siamese Dream went in the opposite direction -- guitar solos galore, layered walls of sound courtesy of the album's producers (Butch Vig and Corgan), extended compositions that bordered on prog rock, plus often reflective and heartfelt lyrics. The four tracks that were selected as singles became alternative radio standards -- the anthems "Cherub Rock," "Today," and "Rocket," plus the symphonic ballad "Disarm" -- but as a whole, Siamese Dream proved to be an incredibly consistent album. Such compositions as the red-hot rockers "Quiet" and "Geek U.S.A." were standouts, as were the epics "Hummer," "Soma," and "Silverfuck," plus the soothing sounds of "Mayonaise," "Spaceboy," and "Luna." After the difficult recording sessions, Corgan stated publicly that if Siamese Dream didn't achieve breakthrough success, he would end the band. He didn't have to worry for long -- the album debuted in the Billboard Top Ten and sold more than four million copies in three years. Siamese Dream stands alongside Nevermind and Superunknown as one of the decade's finest (and most influential) rock albums.

    Track List

    1
    Cherub Rock
    Billy Corgan
    Smashing Pumpkins
    4:58
    2
    Quiet
    Billy Corgan
    Smashing Pumpkins
    3:41
    3
    Today
    Billy Corgan
    Smashing Pumpkins
    3:19
    4
    Hummer
    Billy Corgan
    Smashing Pumpkins
    6:57
    5
    Rocket
    Billy Corgan
    Smashing Pumpkins
    4:06
    6
    Disarm
    Billy Corgan
    Smashing Pumpkins
    3:17
    7
    Soma
    Billy Corgan / James Iha
    Smashing Pumpkins
    6:39
    8
    Geek U.S.A.
    Billy Corgan
    Smashing Pumpkins
    5:13
    9
    Mayonaise
    Billy Corgan / James Iha
    Smashing Pumpkins
    5:49
    10
    Spaceboy
    Billy Corgan / James Iha
    Smashing Pumpkins
    4:28
    11
    Silverfuck
    Billy Corgan
    Smashing Pumpkins
    8:43
    12
    Sweet Sweet
    Billy Corgan
    Smashing Pumpkins
    1:38
    13
    Luna
    Billy Corgan
    Smashing Pumpkins
    3:20

    86 Beastie Boys - Paul's Boutique (1989)

    [​IMG]

    Such was the power of Licensed to Ill that everybody, from fans to critics, thought that not only could the Beastie Boys not top the record, but that they were destined to be a one-shot wonder. These feelings were only amplified by their messy, litigious departure from Def Jam and their flight from their beloved New York to Los Angeles, since it appeared that the Beasties had completely lost the plot. Many critics in fact thought that Paul's Boutique was a muddled mess upon its summer release in 1989, but that's the nature of the record -- it's so dense, it's bewildering at first, revealing its considerable charms with each play. To put it mildly, it's a considerable change from the hard rock of Licensed to Ill, shifting to layers of samples and beats so intertwined they move beyond psychedelic; it's a painting with sound. Paul's Boutique is a record that only could have been made in a specific time and place. Like the Rolling Stones in 1972, the Beastie Boys were in exile and pining for their home, so they made a love letter to downtown New York -- which they could not have done without the Dust Brothers, a Los Angeles-based production duo who helped redefine what sampling could be with this record. Sadly, after Paul's Boutique sampling on the level of what's heard here would disappear; due to a series of lawsuits, most notably Gilbert O'Sullivan's suit against Biz Markie, the entire enterprise too cost-prohibitive and risky to perform on such a grand scale. Which is really a shame, because if ever a record could be used as incontrovertible proof that sampling is its own art form, it's Paul's Boutique. Snatches of familiar music are scattered throughout the record -- anything from Curtis Mayfield's "Superfly" and Sly Stone's "Loose Booty" to Loggins & Messina's "Your Mama Don't Dance" and the Ramones' "Suzy Is a Headbanger" -- but never once are they presented in lazy, predictable ways. the Dust Brothers and Beasties weave a crazy-quilt of samples, beats, loops, and tricks, which creates a hyper-surreal alternate reality -- a romanticized, funhouse reflection of New York where all pop music and culture exist on the same strata, feeding off each other, mocking each other, evolving into a wholly unique record, unlike anything that came before or after. It very well could be that its density is what alienated listeners and critics at the time; there is so much information in the music and words that it can seem impenetrable at first, but upon repeated spins it opens up slowly, assuredly, revealing more every listen. Musically, few hip-hop records have ever been so rich; it's not just the recontextulations of familiar music via samples, it's the flow of each song and the album as a whole, culminating in the widescreen suite that closes the record. Lyrically, the Beasties have never been better -- not just because their jokes are razor-sharp, but because they construct full-bodied narratives and evocative portraits of characters and places. Few pop records offer this much to savor, and if Paul's Boutique only made a modest impact upon its initial release, over time its influence could be heard through pop and rap, yet no matter how its influence was felt, it stands alone as a record of stunning vision, maturity, and accomplishment. Plus, it's a hell of a lot of fun, no matter how many times you've heard it.

    Track List

    1
    To All the Girls
    Beastie Boys / The Dust Brothers / Mike D / Adam Horovitz / Adam Yauch
    Beastie Boys
    1:29
    2
    Shake Your Rump
    Beastie Boys / The Dust Brothers / Mike D / Adam Horovitz / Adam Yauch
    Beastie Boys
    3:19
    3
    Johnny Ryall
    Beastie Boys / The Dust Brothers / Mike D / Adam Horovitz / Adam Yauch
    Beastie Boys
    3:00
    4
    Egg Man
    Beastie Boys / The Dust Brothers / Mike D / Adam Horovitz / Adam Yauch
    Beastie Boys
    2:57
    5
    High Plains Drifter
    Beastie Boys / The Dust Brothers / Mike D / Adam Horovitz / Adam Yauch
    Beastie Boys
    4:13
    6
    The Sounds of Science
    Beastie Boys / The Dust Brothers
    Beastie Boys
    3:11
    7
    3-Minute Rule
    Beastie Boys / The Dust Brothers / Mike D / Adam Horovitz / Adam Yauch
    Beastie Boys
    3:39
    8
    Hey Ladies
    Beastie Boys / The Dust Brothers / Mike D / Adam Horovitz / Adam Yauch
    Beastie Boys
    3:47
    9
    5-Piece Chicken Dinner
    Beastie Boys / The Dust Brothers / Mike D / Adam Horovitz / Adam Yauch
    Beastie Boys
    0:23
    10
    Looking Down the Barrel of a Gun
    Beastie Boys / The Dust Brothers / Mike D / Adam Horovitz / Adam Yauch
    Beastie Boys
    3:28
    11
    Car Thief
    Beastie Boys / The Dust Brothers / Mike D / Adam Horovitz / Adam Yauch
    Beastie Boys
    3:39
    12
    What Comes Around
    Beastie Boys / The Dust Brothers / Mike D / Adam Horovitz / Adam Yauch
    Beastie Boys
    3:07
    13
    Shadrach
    Beastie Boys / The Dust Brothers / Mike D / Adam Horovitz / Adam Yauch
    Beastie Boys
    4:07
    14
    Ask for Janice
    Beastie Boys / The Dust Brothers / Mike D / Adam Horovitz / Adam Yauch
    Beastie Boys
    0:11
    15
    B-Boy Bouillabaisse
    Beastie Boys / The Dust Brothers
    Beastie Boys
    12:33

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    95 Aqua - Aquarium (1997)

    [​IMG]

    "Barbie Girl" is one of those inexplicable pop culture phenomena -- a bouncy, slightly warped Euro-dance song that simultaneously sends up femininity and Barbie dolls. Mattel wasn't too amused, but the public was, making it a huge hit in Europe and America. Like many Europop acts, Aqua isn't capable of delivering another song as insanely catchy as "Barbie Girl," but there's plenty of infectious filler that keeps the album moving along at a nice pace.

    Track List

    1
    Happy Boys & Girls
    K. Delgado / René Dif / Claus Norreen / Søren Rasted
    Aqua
    3:37
    2
    My Oh My
    K. Delgado / René Dif / Claus Norreen / Søren Rasted
    Aqua
    3:25
    3
    Barbie Girl
    K. Delgado / René Dif / Claus Norreen / Lene Grawford Nystrøm / Søren Rasted
    Aqua
    3:16
    4
    Good Morning Sunshine
    K. Delgado / René Dif / Claus Norreen / Søren Rasted
    Aqua
    4:03
    5
    Doctor Jones
    Aqua / René Dif / Søren Rasted
    Aqua
    3:22
    6
    Heat of the Night
    Claus Norreen / Søren Rasted
    Aqua
    3:33
    7
    Be a Man
    Claus Norreen / Søren Rasted
    Aqua
    4:22
    8
    Lollipop (Candyman)
    K. Delgado / René Dif / Hartmann / Claus Norreen / Søren Rasted
    Aqua
    3:35
    9
    Roses Are Red
    René Dif / Hartmann / Jan Langhoff / Claus Norreen / Lene Grawford Nystrøm / Søren Rasted
    Aqua
    3:43
    10
    Turn Back Time
    K. Delgado / Claus Norreen / Søren Rasted
    Aqua
    4:09
    11
    Calling You
    René Dif / Hartmann / Jan Langhoff / Claus Norreen / Søren Rasted
    Aqua
    3:33

    94 De La Soul - 3 Feet High and Rising (1989)

    [​IMG]

    The most inventive, assured, and playful debut in hip-hop history, 3 Feet High and Rising not only proved that rappers didn't have to talk about the streets to succeed, but also expanded the palette of sampling material with a kaleidoscope of sounds and references culled from pop, soul, disco, and even country music. Weaving clever wordplay and deft rhymes across two dozen tracks loosely organized around a game-show theme, De La Soul broke down boundaries all over the LP, moving easily from the groovy my-philosophy intro "The Magic Number" to an intelligent, caring inner-city vignette named "Ghetto Thang" to the freewheeling end-of-innocence tale "Jenifa Taught Me (Derwin's Revenge)." Rappers Posdnuos and Trugoy the Dove talked about anything they wanted (up to and including body odor), playing fast and loose on the mic like Biz Markie. Thinly disguised under a layer of humor, their lyrical themes ranged from true love ("Eye Know") to the destructive power of drugs ("Say No Go") to Daisy Age philosophy ("Tread Water") to sex ("Buddy"). Prince Paul (from Stetsasonic) and DJ Pasemaster Mase led the way on the production end, with dozens of samples from all sorts of left-field artists -- including Johnny Cash, the Mad Lads, Steely Dan, Public Enemy, Hall & Oates, and the Turtles. The pair didn't just use those samples as hooks or drumbreaks -- like most hip-hop producers had in the past -- but as split-second fills and in-jokes that made some tracks sound more like DJ records. Even "Potholes on My Lawn," which samples a mouth harp and yodeling (for the chorus, no less), became a big R&B hit. If it was easy to believe the revolution was here from listening to the rapping and production on Public Enemy's It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back, with De La Soul the Daisy Age seemed to promise a new era of positivity in hip-hop.

    Track List

    1
    Intro
    Trugoy the Dove / Paul Huston / V. Keith Mason / Kelvin Mercer / P. Patterson
    De La Soul
    1:41
    2
    The Magic Number
    Walter Becker / Trugoy the Dove / Donald Fagen / Paul Huston / V. Keith Mason / Kelvin Mercer
    De La Soul
    3:16
    3
    Change in Speak
    S. Allen / Trugoy the Dove / D. Hall / Paul Huston / V. Keith Mason / Kelvin Mercer
    De La Soul
    2:33
    4
    Cool Breeze on the Rocks
    Trugoy the Dove / Kelvin Mercer
    De La Soul
    0:47
    5
    Can U Keep a Secret?
    Trugoy the Dove / Paul Huston / V. Keith Mason / Kelvin Mercer / Q-Tip
    De La Soul
    1:40
    6
    Jenifa Taught Me (Derwin's Revenge)
    Paul Huston / David Jolicoeur / Vincent Mason / Kelvin Mercer
    De La Soul
    3:25
    7
    Ghetto Thang
    George Clinton / Trugoy the Dove / Paul Huston / V. Keith Mason / Kelvin Mercer
    De La Soul
    3:35
    8
    Transmitting Live from Mars
    Trugoy the Dove / Paul Huston / V. Keith Mason / Kelvin Mercer
    De La Soul
    1:11
    9
    Eye Know
    Trugoy the Dove / Paul Huston / V. Keith Mason / Kelvin Mercer
    De La Soul
    4:13
    10
    Take It Off
    Trugoy the Dove / Paul Huston / V. Keith Mason / Kelvin Mercer
    De La Soul
    1:52
    11
    A Little Bit of Soap
    Trugoy the Dove / Paul Huston / Vincent Mason / Kelvin Mercer
    De La Soul
    0:49
    12
    Tread Water
    Trugoy the Dove / Paul Huston / V. Keith Mason / Kelvin Mercer
    De La Soul
    3:52
    13
    Potholes in My Lawn
    Paul Huston / David Jolicoeur / Vincent Mason / Kelvin Mercer
    De La Soul
    3:50
    14
    Say No Go
    Trugoy the Dove / Paul Huston / V. Keith Mason
    De La Soul
    4:20
    15
    Do as De La Does
    Trugoy the Dove / Paul Huston / V. Keith Mason / Kelvin Mercer
    De La Soul
    2:06
    16
    Plug Tunin'
    Trugoy the Dove / Paul Huston / Vincent Mason / Kelvin Mercer
    De La Soul
    4:12
    17
    De la Orgee
    Trugoy the Dove / Paul Huston / V. Keith Mason / Kelvin Mercer
    De La Soul
    1:13
    18
    Buddy
    Trugoy the Dove / Penelope Houston / Vincent Mason / Kelvin Mercer
    De La Soul
    feat. Jungle Brothers, Q-Tip 4:54
    19
    Description
    Trugoy the Dove / Paul Huston / V. Keith Mason / Kelvin Mercer
    De La Soul
    1:31
    20
    Me, Myself and I
    Trugoy the Dove / Pasemaster Mase / Prince Paul / Posdnuos
    De La Soul
    3:40
    21
    This Is a Recording 4 Living in a Fulltime Era (L.I.F.E.)
    Trugoy the Dove / Paul Huston / V. Keith Mason / Kelvin Mercer
    De La Soul
    3:19
    22
    I Can Do Anything (Delacratic)
    Trugoy the Dove / Paul Huston / V. Keith Mason / Kelvin Mercer
    De La Soul
    0:41
    23
    D.A.I.S.Y. Age
    Trugoy the Dove / Paul Huston / V. Keith Mason / Kelvin Mercer
    De La Soul
    4:42
    24
    Plug Tunin'
    Trugoy the Dove / Paul Huston / Vincent Mason / Kelvin Mercer
    De La Soul
    3:43

    93 Cream - Wheels of Fire (1968)

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    If Disraeli Gears was the album where Cream came into their own, its successor, Wheels of Fire, finds the trio in full fight, capturing every side of their multi-faceted personality, even hinting at the internal pressures that soon would tear the band asunder. A dense, unwieldy double album split into an LP of new studio material and an LP of live material, it's sprawling and scattered, at once awesome in its achievement and maddening in how it falls just short of greatness. It misses its goal not because one LP works and the other doesn't, but because both the live and studio sets suffer from strikingly similar flaws, deriving from the constant power struggle between the trio. Of the three, Ginger Baker comes up short, contributing the passable "Passing the Time" and "Those Were the Days," which are overshadowed by how he extends his solo drum showcase "Toad" to a numbing quarter of an hour and trips upon the Wind & the Willows whimsy of "Pressed Rat and Warthog," whose studied eccentricity pales next to Eric Clapton's nimble, eerily cheerful "Anyone for Tennis." In almost every regard, Wheels of Fire is a terrific showcase for Clapton as a guitarist, especially on the first side of the live album with "Crossroads," a mighty encapsulation of all of his strengths. Some of that is studio trickery, as producer Felix Pappalardi cut together the best bits of a winding improvisation to a tight four minutes, giving this track a relentless momentum that's exceptionally exciting, but there's no denying that Clapton is at a peak here, whether he's tearing off solos on a 17-minute "Spoonful" or goosing "White Room" toward the heights of madness. But it's the architect of "White Room," bassist Jack Bruce, who, along with his collaborator Peter Brown, reaches a peak as a songwriter. Aside from the monumental "White Room," he has the lovely, wistful "As You Said," the cinematic "Deserted Cities of the Heart," and the slow, cynical blues "Politician," all among Cream's very best work. And in many ways Wheels of Fire is indeed filled with Cream's very best work, since it also captures the fury and invention (and indulgence) of the band at its peak on the stage and in the studio, but as it tries to find a delicate balance between these three titanic egos, it doesn't quite add up to something greater than the sum of its parts. But taken alone, those individual parts are often quite tremendous.

    Track List

    1
    White Room
    Pete Brown / Jack Bruce
    Cream
    4:57
    2
    Sitting on Top of the World
    Lonnie Chatmon / Walter Vinson
    Cream
    4:56
    3
    Passing the Time
    Ginger Baker / Mike Taylor
    Cream
    5:45
    4
    As You Said
    Pete Brown / Jack Bruce
    Cream
    4:19
    5
    Pressed Rat and Warthog
    Ginger Baker / Mike Taylor
    Cream
    3:14
    6
    Politician
    Pete Brown / Jack Bruce
    Cream
    4:11
    7
    Those Were the Days
    Ginger Baker / Mike Taylor
    Cream
    2:53
    8
    Born Under a Bad Sign
    William Bell / Booker T. Jones
    Cream
    3:09
    9
    Deserted Cities of the Heart
    Pete Brown / Jack Bruce
    Cream
    4:36

    92 Alicia Keys - The Element of Freedom (2009)

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    Don’t mistake the presence of Jay-Z and Beyoncé on Alicia Keys' fourth album as evidence that the singer/songwriter is burrowing into modern R&B -- take it instead as evidence of the rarefied company Keys keeps, her status as a superstar so solidified that the only cameos possible are R&B/hip-hop elite. Superstars are often given leeway to do anything they want, and so it is on The Element of Freedom, where Keys dials back the outward expansion of As I Am and turns inward, creating a clean, small-scale collection of ballads and Prince-inspired pop. Always apparent on Alicia’s albums, that Prince influence is underscored by how she’s swapped the retro-soul instrumentation of her earliest music for electronics, but she’s retained the warmth, the throwback sensibility and, especially, a sense of reserve, never getting too heated or gauche. This does mean the Prince elements feel more NPG than Revolution, but Keys trademark always has been an easy elegance. On The Element of Freedom, that elegance is so easy it borders on the sleepy, with Keys’ understatement undercutting livelier numbers -- chief among them the bubbly Beyoncé duet “Put It in a Love Song” -- so they play as ballads. This isn’t a complaint so much as a characteristic: her voice may crack on “Love Is My Disease,” but Keys never gets gritty, she remains reserved, never letting her singing or arrangements obscure the melodies or the classy veneer of the entire proceedings. All this determined detachment keeps The Element of Freedom from packing a primal, passionate punch, but there is charm in Alicia’s enveloping, quiet cool: she may never break a sweat, but she knows how to sustain a sultry, not necessarily sexy, mood, and she does so here quite fetchingly.

    Track List

    1
    The Element of Freedom [Intro]
    Alicia Keys
    0:13
    2
    Love Is Blind
    Jeff Bhasker / Alicia Keys
    Alicia Keys
    3:55
    3
    Doesn't Mean Anything
    Kerry Brothers / Alicia Keys
    Alicia Keys
    4:39
    4
    Try Sleeping with a Broken Heart
    Jeff Bhasker / Alicia Keys / Patrick "Plain Pat" Reynolds
    Alicia Keys
    3:00
    5
    Wait 'Til They See My Smile
    Jeff Bhasker / Kasseem Dean / Alicia Keys
    Alicia Keys
    4:01
    6
    That's How Strong My Love Is
    Alicia Keys
    Alicia Keys
    4:05
    7
    Unthinkable (I'm Ready)
    Kerry Brothers / Alicia Keys / Noah Shebib
    Alicia Keys
    4:09
    8
    Love Is My Disease
    Kerry Brothers / Toby Gad / Alicia Keys / Melini Smith
    Alicia Keys
    4:02
    9
    Like the Sea
    Jeff Bhasker / Alicia Keys
    Alicia Keys
    4:13
    10
    Put It in a Love Song
    Kasseem Dean / Alicia Keys
    Alicia Keys
    feat. Beyoncé 3:15
    11
    This Bed
    Kerry Brothers / Alicia Keys / Steve Mostyn
    Alicia Keys
    3:45
    12
    Distance and Time
    Kerry Brothers / Alicia Keys / Steve Mostyn
    Alicia Keys
    4:27
    13
    How It Feels to Fly
    Kerry Brothers / Alicia Keys
    Alicia Keys
    4:42
    14
    Empire State of Mind, Pt. 2: Broken Down
    Shawn Carter / Angela Hunte / Bert Keyes / Alicia Keys / Sylvia Robinson / Janeït Sewell-Ulepic / Al Shuckburgh
    Alicia Keys
    3:43

    91 B.B. King - The Best of B.B King (1999)

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    Like any record company worth their salt, MCA knows a good gimmick when they see it, and when the millennium came around -- well, the 20th Century Masters -- The Millennium Collection wasn't too far behind. Supposedly, the millennium is a momentous occasion, but it's hard to feel that way when it's used as another excuse to turn out a budget-line series. But apart from the presumptuous title, 20th Century Masters -- The Millennium Collection turns out to be a very good budget-line series. True, it's impossible for any of these brief collections to be definitive, but they're nevertheless solid samplers that don't feature a bad song in the bunch. For example, take B.B. King's 20th Century volume -- it's an irresistible ten-song summary of his MCA recordings. There may be a couple of noteworthy songs missing, but many of his best-known songs for the label are here, including "The Thrill Is Gone," "Ain't Nobody Home," "Let the Good Times Roll," "Don't Answer the Door," "Sweet Sixteen," and "Paying the Cost to Be the Boss." Serious fans will want something more extensive, but this is an excellent introduction for neophytes and a great sampler for casual fans, considering its length and price. That doesn't erase the ridiculousness of the series title, but the silliness is excusable when the music and the collections are good.

    Track List

    1
    The Thrill Is Gone
    Rick Darnell / Roy Hawkins
    B.B. King
    5:27
    2
    Ain't Nobody Home
    Jerry Ragovoy
    B.B. King
    3:16
    3
    Let the Good Times Roll
    Fleecie Moore / Sam Theard
    B.B. King
    5:32
    4
    Guess Who?
    Jesse Belvin / JoAnne Belvin
    B.B. King
    4:09
    5
    I Like to Live the Love
    Dave Crawford / Charles Mann
    B.B. King
    3:32
    6
    Don't Answer the Door
    J. Johnson / Mark Johnson
    B.B. King
    5:11
    7
    Sweet Sixteen
    Joe Josea / B.B. King / Riley King
    B.B. King
    6:13
    8
    Paying the Cost to Be the Boss
    B.B. King / Riley King
    B.B. King
    2:35
    9
    I Got Some Help I Don't Need
    Dave Clark / Riley King
    B.B. King
    3:25
    10
    Into the Night
    Ira Newborn
    B.B. King
    4:10

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  6. boki71

    boki71 Uz duplu Anu... Administrator

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    100 Bon Jovi - Slippery When Wet (1986)

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    Slippery When Wet wasn't just a breakthrough album for Bon Jovi; it was a breakthrough for hair metal in general, marking the point where the genre officially entered the mainstream. Released in 1986, it presented a streamlined combination of pop, hard rock, and metal that appealed to everyone -- especially girls, whom traditional heavy metal often ignored. Slippery When Wet was more indebted to pop than metal, though, and the band made no attempt to hide its commercial ambition, even hiring an outside songwriter to co-write two of the album's biggest singles. The trick paid off as Slippery When Wet became the best-selling album of 1987, beating out contenders like Appetite for Destruction, The Joshua Tree, and Michael Jackson's Bad.

    Part of the album's success could be attributed to Desmond Child, a behind-the-scenes songwriter who went on to write hits for Aerosmith, Michael Bolton, and Ricky Martin. With Child's help, Bon Jovi penned a pair of songs that would eventually define their career -- “Living on a Prayer” and “You Give Love a Bad Name” -- two teenage anthems that mixed Springsteen's blue-collar narratives with straightforward, guitar-driven hooks. The band's characters may have been down on their luck -- they worked dead-end jobs, pined for dangerous women, and occasionally rode steel horses -- but Bon Jovi never presented a problem that couldn’t be cured by a good chorus, every one of which seemed to celebrate a glass-half-full mentality. Elsewhere, the group turned to nostalgia, using songs like “Never Say Goodbye” and “Wild in the Streets” to re-create (or fabricate) an untamed, sex-filled youth that undoubtedly appealed to the band’s teen audience. Bon Jovi wasn't nearly as hard-edged as Mötley Crüe or technically proficient as Van Halen, but the guys smartly played to their strengths, shunning the extremes for an accessible, middle-of-the-road approach that wound up appealing to more fans than most of their peers. “It’s alright if you have a good time,” Jon Bon Jovi sang on Slippery When Wet’s first track, “Let It Rock,” and those words essentially served as a mantra for the entire hair metal genre, whose carefree, party-heavy attitude became the soundtrack for the rest of the ‘80s.

    Track List

    1
    Let It Rock
    Jon Bon Jovi / Richie Sambora
    Bon Jovi
    5:25
    2
    You Give Love a Bad Name
    Desmond Child / Jon Bon Jovi / Richie Sambora
    Bon Jovi
    3:43
    3
    Livin' on a Prayer
    Desmond Child / Jon Bon Jovi / Richie Sambora
    Bon Jovi
    4:09
    4
    Social Disease
    Jon Bon Jovi / Richie Sambora
    Bon Jovi
    4:18
    5
    Wanted Dead or Alive
    Jon Bon Jovi / Richie Sambora
    Bon Jovi
    5:09
    6
    Raise Your Hands
    Jon Bon Jovi / Richie Sambora
    Bon Jovi
    4:17
    7
    Without Love
    Desmond Child / Jon Bon Jovi / Richie Sambora
    Bon Jovi
    3:31
    8
    I'd Die for You
    Jon Bon Jovi / Richie Sambora
    Bon Jovi
    4:30
    9
    Never Say Goodbye
    Jon Bon Jovi / Richie Sambora
    Bon Jovi
    4:49
    10
    Wild in the Streets
    Jon Bon Jovi
    Bon Jovi
    3:56

    99 Metallica - Metallica (1991)

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    After the muddled production and ultracomplicated song structures of ...And Justice for All, Metallica decided that they had taken the progressive elements of their music as far as they could and that a simplification and streamlining of their sound was in order. While the assessment made sense from a musical standpoint, it also presented an opportunity to commercialize their music, and Metallica accomplishes both goals. The best songs are more melodic and immediate, the crushing, stripped-down grooves of "Enter Sandman," "Sad but True," and "Wherever I May Roam" sticking to traditional structures and using the same main riffs throughout; the crisp, professional production by Bob Rock adds to their accessibility. "The Unforgiven" and "Nothing Else Matters" avoid the slash-and-burn guitar riffs that had always punctuated the band's ballads; the latter is a full-fledged love song complete with string section, which works much better than might be imagined. The song- and riff-writing slips here and there, a rare occurrence for Metallica, which some longtime fans interpreted as filler next to a batch of singles calculated for commercial success. The objections were often more to the idea that Metallica was doing anything explicitly commercial, but millions more disagreed. In fact, the band's popularity exploded so much that most of their back catalog found mainstream acceptance in its own right, while other progressively inclined speed metal bands copied the move toward simplification. In retrospect, Metallica is a good, but not quite great, album, one whose best moments deservedly captured the heavy metal crown, but whose approach also foreshadowed a creative decline.

    Track List

    1
    Enter Sandman
    Kirk Hammett / James Hetfield / Lars Ulrich
    Metallica
    5:31
    2
    Sad But True
    James Hetfield / Lars Ulrich
    Metallica
    5:24
    3
    Holier Than Thou
    James Hetfield / Lars Ulrich
    Metallica
    3:47
    4
    The Unforgiven
    Kirk Hammett / James Hetfield / Lars Ulrich
    Metallica
    6:27
    5
    Wherever I May Roam
    James Hetfield / Lars Ulrich
    Metallica
    6:44
    6
    Don't Tread on Me
    James Hetfield / Lars Ulrich
    Metallica
    4:00
    7
    Through the Never
    Kirk Hammett / James Hetfield / Lars Ulrich
    Metallica
    4:04
    8
    Nothing Else Matters
    James Hetfield / Lars Ulrich
    Metallica
    6:28
    9
    Of Wolf and Man
    Kirk Hammett / James Hetfield / Lars Ulrich
    Metallica
    4:16
    10
    The God That Failed
    James Hetfield / Lars Ulrich
    Metallica
    5:08
    11
    My Friend of Misery
    James Hetfield / Jason Newsted / Lars Ulrich
    Metallica
    6:49
    12
    The Struggle Within
    James Hetfield / Lars Ulrich
    Metallica
    3:53

    98 Primal Scream - Screamadelica (1991)

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    There's no overestimating the importance of Screamadelica, the record that brought acid house, techno, and rave culture crashing into the British mainstream -- an impact that rivaled that of Nirvana's Nevermind, the other 1991 release that changed rock. Prior to Screamadelica, Primal Scream were Stonesy classic rock revivalists with a penchant for Detroit rock. They retained those fascinations on Screamadelica -- one listen to the Jimmy Miller-produced, Stephen Stills-rip "Movin' on Up" proves that -- but they burst everything wide open here, turning rock inside out by marrying it to a gleeful rainbow of modern dance textures. This is such a brilliant, gutsy innovative record, so unlike anything the Scream did before, that it's little wonder that there's been much debate behind who is actually responsible for its grooves, especially since Andrew Weatherall is credited with production with eight of the tracks, and it's clearly in line with his work. Even if Primal Scream took credit for Weatherall's endeavors, that doesn't erase the fact that they shepherded this album, providing the ideas and impetus for this dubtastic, elastic, psychedelic exercise in deep house and neo-psychedelic. Like any dance music, this is tied to its era to a certain extent, but it transcends it due to its fierce imagination and how it doubles back on rock history, making the past present and vice versa. It was such a monumental step forward that Primal Scream stumbled before regaining their footing, but by that point, the innovations of Screamadelica had been absorbed by everyone from the underground to mainstream. There's little chance that this record will be as revolutionary to first-time listeners, but after its initial spin, the genius in its construction will become apparent -- and it's that attention to detail that makes Screamadelica an album that transcends its time and influence.

    Track List

    1
    Movin' on Up
    Bobby Gillespie / Andrew Innes / Robert Young
    Primal Scream
    3:51
    2
    Slip Inside This House
    Roky Erickson / Tommy Hall
    Primal Scream
    5:16
    3
    Don't Fight It, Feel It
    Bobby Gillespie / Andrew Innes / Robert Young
    Primal Scream
    feat. Denise Johnson 6:53
    4
    Higher Than the Sun
    Bobby Gillespie / Andrew Innes / Robert Young
    Primal Scream
    3:38
    5
    Inner Flight
    Bobby Gillespie / Andrew Innes / Robert Young
    Primal Scream
    5:01
    6
    Come Together
    Bobby Gillespie / Andrew Innes / Robert Young
    Primal Scream
    10:21
    7
    Loaded
    Bobby Gillespie / Andrew Innes / Robert Young
    Primal Scream
    7:02
    8
    Damaged
    Bobby Gillespie / Andrew Innes / Robert Young
    Primal Scream
    5:39
    9
    I'm Comin' Down
    Bobby Gillespie / Andrew Innes / Robert Young
    Primal Scream
    6:00
    10
    Higher Than the Sun (A Dub Symphony in Two Parts)
    Bobby Gillespie / Andrew Innes / Robert Young
    Primal Scream
    feat. Jah Wobble 7:38
    11
    Shine Like Stars
    Bobby Gillespie / Andrew Innes / Robert Young
    Primal Scream
    3:45

    97 Lynyrd Skynyrd - Pronounced Leh-Nerd Skin-Nerd (1973)

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    The Allman Brothers came first, but Lynyrd Skynyrd epitomized Southern rock. The Allmans were exceptionally gifted musicians, as much bluesmen as rockers. Skynyrd was nothing but rockers, and they were Southern rockers to the bone. This didn't just mean that they were rednecks, but that they brought it all together -- the blues, country, garage rock, Southern poetry -- in a way that sounded more like the South than even The Allmans. And a large portion of that derives from their hard, lean edge, which was nowhere more apparent than on their debut album, Pronounced Leh-Nerd Skin-Nerd. Produced by Al Kooper, there are few records that sound this raw and uncompromising, especially records by debut bands. Then again, few bands sound this confident and fully formed with their first record. Perhaps the record is stronger because it's only eight songs, so there isn't a wasted moment, but that doesn't discount the sheer strength of each song. Consider the opening juxtaposition of the rollicking "I Ain't the One" with the heartbreaking "Tuesday's Gone." Two songs couldn't be more opposed, yet Skynyrd sounds equally convincing on both. If that's all the record did, it would still be fondly regarded, but it wouldn't have been influential. The genius of Skynyrd is that they un-self-consciously blended album-oriented hard rock, blues, country, and garage rock, turning it all into a distinctive sound that sounds familiar but thoroughly unique. On top of that, there's the highly individual voice of Ronnie Van Zant, a songwriter who isn't afraid to be nakedly sentimental, spin tales of the South, or to twist macho conventions with humor. And, lest we forget, while he does this, the band rocks like a motherf*cker. It's the birth of a great band that birthed an entire genre with this album.

    Track List

    1
    I Ain't the One
    Gary Rossington / Ronnie Van Zant
    Lynyrd Skynyrd
    3:53
    2
    Tuesday's Gone
    Allen Collins / Ronnie Van Zant
    Lynyrd Skynyrd
    7:32
    3
    Gimme Three Steps
    Allen Collins / Ronnie Van Zant
    Lynyrd Skynyrd
    4:30
    4
    Simple Man
    Gary Rossington / Ronnie Van Zant
    Lynyrd Skynyrd
    5:57
    5
    Things Goin' On
    Gary Rossington / Ronnie Van Zant
    Lynyrd Skynyrd
    4:59
    6
    Mississippi Kid
    Robert Burns / Al Kooper / Ronnie Van Zant
    Lynyrd Skynyrd
    3:56
    7
    Poison Whiskey
    Ed King / Ronnie Van Zant
    Lynyrd Skynyrd
    3:13
    8
    Free Bird
    Allen Collins / Ronnie Van Zant
    Lynyrd Skynyrd
    9:18

    96 Creedence Clearwater Revival - Bayou Country (1969)

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    Opening slowly with the dark, swampy "Born on the Bayou," Bayou Country reveals an assured Creedence Clearwater Revival, a band that has found its voice between their first and second album. It's not just that "Born on the Bayou" announces that CCR has discovered its sound -- it reveals the extent of John Fogerty's myth-making. With this song, he sketches out his persona; it makes him sound as if he crawled out of the backwoods of Louisiana instead of being a native San Franciscan. He carries this illusion throughout the record, through the ominous meanderings of "Graveyard Train" through the stoked cover of "Good Golly Miss Molly" to "Keep on Chooglin'," which rides out a southern-fried groove for nearly eight minutes. At the heart of Bayou Country, as well as Fogerty's myth and Creedence's entire career, is "Proud Mary." A riverboat tale where the narrator leaves a good job in the city for a life rolling down the river, the song is filled with details that ring so true that it feels autobiographical. The lyric is married to music that is utterly unique yet curiously timeless, blending rockabilly, country, and Stax R&B into something utterly distinctive and addictive. "Proud Mary" is the emotional fulcrum at the center of Fogerty's seductive imaginary Americana, and while it's the best song here, his other songs are no slouch, either. "Born on the Bayou" is a magnificent piece of swamp-rock, "Penthouse Pauper" is a first-rate rocker with the angry undertow apparent on "Porterville" and "Bootleg" is a minor masterpiece, thanks to its tough acoustic foundation, sterling guitar work, and clever story. All the songs add up to a superb statement of purpose, a record that captures Creedence Clearwater Revival's muscular, spare, deceptively simple sound as an evocative portrait of America.

    Track List

    1
    Born on the Bayou
    John Fogerty
    Creedence Clearwater Revival
    5:16
    2
    Bootleg
    John Fogerty
    Creedence Clearwater Revival
    3:02
    3
    Graveyard Train
    John Fogerty
    Creedence Clearwater Revival
    8:37
    4
    Good Golly Miss Molly
    Robert "Bumps" Blackwell / Robert A. Blackwell / John Marascalco / Richard Wayne Penniman
    Creedence Clearwater Revival
    2:44
    5
    Penthouse Pauper
    John Fogerty
    Creedence Clearwater Revival
    3:39
    6
    Proud Mary
    John Fogerty
    Creedence Clearwater Revival
    3:08
    7
    Keep on Chooglin'
    John Fogerty
    Creedence Clearwater Revival
    7:41

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